Select Page

Every Thursday the Sixtysix newsletter delivers the latest creative news, designs, and insights straight to your inbox. Here are this week’s highlights. Not on the email list? Subscribe now.

***

A creative configuration makes this narrow Barcelona space feel like home for one design duo.

+ Because of the space’s narrow layout, architect Román Sarrió, founder of architecture studio RRIO, gutted the home’s existing partitions to create a more open space for himself and his wife, designer Gabriela Comella.

+ One of the most notable features is the kitchen, which was previously a hallway. “It has evolved from a space merely dedicated to circulation to playing an important role in the life of the house,” Román told Clever. “It is now where we meet after a day at work or where our friends gather while someone is cooking. It has completely rearranged the internal logistics of the space and how you interact with it.”

Photo courtesy of Herman Miller

In other design news, Herman Miller relaunches Ray Wilkes’ “Chiclet” sofa system.

+ Originally designed in the 1970s, the Wilkes Modular Sofa Group was known for its Chiclet gum-like shape and contoured form. Revolutionary injection foam molding was used to create its smooth, uniform shape.

+ The design was discontinued in 1986, but using Head of Archives and Brand Heritage Amy Auscherman’s own vintage two-seat sofa, as well as archival technical drawings and material development, Herman Miller was able to put the sofa system back into production.

camp sarika main restaurant

Camp Sarika in Canyon Point, Utah.

Ready, set, travel: The 2021 hotel hot list is here.

+ The list includes design favorites Paragon 700 in Puglia, Italy, where interior designer Pascale Lauber transformed a former 17th-century red palace, and Habitas Namibia in Windhoek, Namibia, that was designed to bring guests closer to nature.

+ In the US, Camp Sarika in Canyon Point, Utah, makes the list. The property sits on 78 acres of desert, where the design team of Graeme Labe, Anomien Smith, and interior designer Idalina Silva of Luxury Frontiers has created a “seamless aesthetic connection between the architecture and surrounding landscape.”

 

Darryl Brown is bringing authenticity to fashion’s workwear trend.

+ The designer is a former railroad engineer who worked as a conductor in Toledo, Ohio, where he’s from, and also on the General Motors assembly line, building the front of Monte Carlo cars.

+ “Workwear was becoming a trend. It was something that was so true to me—so I wanted to offer my take on it,” Darryl told Highsnobiety. “I worked in different blue collar, 9 to 5 industrial jobs. Pretty much like the DNA of the Midwest. Fashion was kind of something that I just fell into.”

Photo courtesy of taktcph.com

Kim Colin and Sam Hecht of Industrial Facility design a chair reflecting a cultural shift in furniture.

+ A collaboration with TAKT, the design duo started by considering how life has changed over the decades, and how furniture can respond to those shifts.

+ The result was the Sling Lounge Chair, meant to emphasize the more casual character of today’s “lighter living” with a lower-than-standard slung seat and material lightness that make it easy to move around.

Photo courtesy of luminaireauthentik.com

Sculptor Jeremy Le Chetalier’s intuitive new collection sees lighting as art.

+ The Solstice collection is a collaboration with Luminaire Authentik. Jeremy, a Montreal-based artist, did not use any preliminary sketches for the collection, instead following his artistic instinct to create light fixtures that double as a work of art. Each light is handmade with found, upcycled materials and is signed and numbered.

+ The collection was inspired by Wavi Sabi, brutalism, Vervoordt, and raw materials, brought together with a touch of Scandinavian design.

Photo courtesy of batekarchitekten.com

In Berlin, Batek Architekten revamps a centuries-old arthouse cinema.

+ The historic Blauer Stern opened in the Pankow neighborhood in north Berlin in 1870.

+ Batek infused the space with dramatic colors and neon lights that reference the cinema’s original mouldings in the foyer.

***

Want this news roundup send straight to your inbox? Subscribe below.